Books

Neil Young on Neil Young

Waging Heavy Peace is exactly what you’d expect a Neil Young autobiography to be like.

Written at age 66, Waging Heavy Peace (Blue Rider Press, 502 pages) is exactly what you’d expect a Neil Young autobiography to be like. Wildly candid and disorienting in its jumps, much like a ping-pong ball across a table of time, the book doesn’t follow rhyme, reason or even a rhythm. Young talks about what he wants to talk about, and when he wants to talk about it, as chapters jarringly move from a story about a dying friend to a passage about his wife’s dog.



Say Yes and the Neighsayers

Gene Maeroff, author of a book on Say Yes to Education, is concerned about the program’s future in Syracuse

The people of Syracuse “placed an ambitious bet” in the early 21st century, says former New York Times education correspondent Gene Maeroff, author of a new book on Say Yes to Education in Syracuse.



The Book of Jezebel

Jezebel.com’s feminism hits a chord with youth

Editor’s note: Voices is a weekly column that provides a platform for Central New Yorkers to comment about the issues of the day. If you’d like to submit a column, email Larry Dietrich at ldietrich@syracusenewtimes.com.



Bruce Gets Loose

The keynote makes for an ideal end to the book.

Springsteen on Springsteen: Interviews, Speeches and Encounters (Chicago Review Press; 432 pages, softcover; $27.95) isn’t a typical biography or autobiography. Although it tells the story of the singer-songwriter primarily through words from his own mouth, it’s not a straight-ahead, linear account of his life’s work. Rather, it’s a collection of interviews, speeches and encounters over the course of The Boss’ career, which makes for a textured read featuring attitudes garnered from different periods and historical contexts that affect the meanings of each excerpt.



Walks on the Wild Side

All the chapters have some kind of visual aid to support the stories.

“Who knew it was a riot that prompted politicians to make Syracuse the city it is today?” asks Neil MacMillan. His new book, Wicked Syracuse: A History of Sin in the Salt City (The History Press; 144 pages; paperback, $16.50), reports some of the lesser-known facts about crime in the city.



Short Storyteller

by Staff

Pashley’s stories follow the worst aspects of a character’s life

"Bad decisions make good stories,” says Jennifer Pashley.



A Sense of Place Within the Pages

It’s commonly said that reading has the power to take you anywhere, but books with a strong sense of place take that to a whole new level. Part of Baldwinsville librarian Holly Nichols’ reason for giving away copies of J.R. Moehringer’s The Tender Bar for World Book Night (which I wrote about here) was the […]

It’s commonly said that reading has the power to take you anywhere, but books with a strong sense of place take that to a whole new level. Part of Baldwinsville librarian Holly Nichols’ reason for giving away copies of J.R. Moehringer’s The Tender Bar for World Book Night (which I wrote about here) was the memoir’s New York setting.



Jackie Unchained

A new book published by Syracuse University Press gives us a fuller picture of Jackie Robinson

Jackie Robinson is a true American hero. No one can honestly argue otherwise. In Syracuse, we might even call him a local hero if we were willing to stretch the meaning a bit: The Montreal Royals, the Brooklyn Dodgers’ minor-league affiliate with whom Robinson broke the professional color line,  played in Syracuse against the Chiefs during his tenure with the team. The Royals eventually moved to Syracuse, becoming the current incarnation of the Chiefs in 1961.



The Write Stuff

International Writers Week at Hamilton College

Hamilton College is currently hosting an International Writers Week through Saturday, March 2, with an international book fair, panel discussions and readings with literary guests from around the globe.



Melting Pot

It’s not a unique story – but it is, indeed, uniquely American.

Syracuse native Bill Rezak is the first to admit that his family’s history might not be exactly novel. But that certainly doesn’t mean it’s not worth telling.